Assignment: You are embroiled in a formal debate about an issue in your field, a

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Assignment:
You are embroiled in a formal debate about an issue in your field, and you are considered to be an expert. As such, you have been called upon to write a paper defending your views with research and evidence. The only problem? You are writing for a publication that has been outspoken against your viewpoint. In other words, most of the readers are going to be inclined to disagree with you. Your goal is to persuade them to change their minds, or, at least, to open up their minds enough to consider your viewpoint.
Purpose:
Argumentative writing does not mean shouting or telling someone they are wrong. It means building an effective logical progression of ideas to help make a point for your audience.
What is an Argument:
An argument is a logical progression of ideas and tools used to make a point about an issue. This means being aware of how you’re approaching the topic, how you’re presenting information, and how you’re supporting your ideas. For this assignment you will be taking a side on the issue and arguing that position.
What Can Be Used:
You will identify an issue or problem in your field. This can be anything you want, as long as it’s about YOUR field. Think about problems you’ve identified or heard others talk about. Are there any problems that you became aware of because of the cause and effect essay? You will also need to incorporate AT LEAST THREE (3) SOURCES to supplement your points with evidence.
Length:
Your final draft should be FOUR (4) TO FIVE (5) FULL PAGES. Failure to turn in a final draft of at least four pages will result in losing at least half the points for this assignment.
Evaluation:
At a minimum, your paper needs to satisfy the following criteria. However, the grade is based not just on whether a feature is present or not, but on how well it has been integrated into your paper. The argument essay should show the following:
Thoughtful and perceptive treatment of topic; original approach; scope sufficiently focused
Purpose is clear (educate, entertain, persuade) and consistent. The “So what?” question is answered
Clear sense of audience & attention to audience’s needs. Introduction engages audience’s interest.
Content is fully developed, relevant, and substantial
Details are carefully chosen and specific.
Focuses on a precise, interesting and insightful point, question, or narrative theme that guides development and organization
Follows a logical arrangement for this material appropriately organized into paragraphs.
The relationship among ideas is clear; coherent; transitional devices used to guide the reader.
Expression is clear and concise. Good choices in use of dialogue, details, visuals
Vocabulary is precise, vivid and appropriate word choice
Conventions/Correctness: Writing is free from sentence-level errors and word choice errors
Consistency in typography, headings.
Minimum Requirements:
–A typed final draft of at least FOUR (4) pages
–MLA essay format: double spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, 1-inch margins, page numbers, and title and header on first page
–Demonstration of ability to stick to main points and ideas as relevant
–Participation in the in-class activities, working time, and peer review workshop


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